History and Hops Explores the Mouth of the Columbia

History and Hops Explores the Mouth of the Columbia

The immense structures that define the mouth of the Columbia River took more than 50 years to build with the best turn-of-the-century technology. For the North Jetty, alone, steamships and locomotives moved and placed over 3 million tons of stone. Their construction has had a profound effect on both the people and the landscape of our region.

“Rails in the Surf: Reshaping the Mouth of the Columbia River”, the story of the construction of the jetties — a story of pile drivers and railroad cars, of tugs and barges and of locomotives and shipwreck – will be recounted at Seaside Museum’s monthly History & Hops on Thursday, September 27th at 6PM at the Seaside Brewing Co by Gary Kobes.

Kobes, a Chinook resident, and self-described “history addict,” is the manager of the Astoria-Warrenton Regional Airport, and volunteers on the boards of the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum (CPHM) in Ilwaco as well as the Columbia River Maritime Museum. He is a founding member of the Nahcotta railroad passenger car preservation committee and has a deep affinity for the history of railroads and engineering. According to CPHM Director Betsy Millard, Kobes is known among researchers and historians of the area as “the go-to expert” for information about the jetties on both sides of the Columbia River.

History & Hops is a series of local history discussions hosted by the Seaside Museum on the last Thursday of each month, September through May, at Seaside Brewing Co., 861 Broadway.

 Preserving Seaside’s History since 1974, the Seaside Museum and Historical Society is a non-profit educational institution with the mission to collect, preserve and interpret materials illustrative of the history of Seaside and the surrounding area.  The museum is located at 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside and is open Monday through Saturday from 10A to 3PM.  More information can be found at www.seasideoregonuseum.com

 

Advertisements

Newsletter – September 2018

NEWSLETTER   SEPTEMBER  2018

~~ events and happenings ~~

MISSION – Collect, preserve and interpret materials illustrative of the history of Seaside and the surrounding area

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 PRESIDENT –  Steve Wright

 VICE-PRESIDENT – Tita Montero

 TREASURER –  David Huntington

 SECRETARY –  Ken Heman

 DIRECTORS –  Sharon Anderson,  Kim Reef, Stephen Reef,  Karen Rossi

Encore or Return?

We are so pleased that the Pacific Northwest Living Historians invited SMHS to partner in presenting Lewis and Clark Salt Makers.   Besides bring involved in a fun and educational program, we have a new opportunity to assess whether it can reinstated on an annual basis.  We will provide ways for you to give us feedback and input as we make a decision in the coming months.

 

Last Thursday of the month 

September through June

6PM

Seaside Brewing Co.

 

 

 

 

Lewis and Clark Salt Makers

October 6th & 7th, 2018

9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Saturday

9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Sunday

Seaside, Oregon

Living History on the Beach at Seaside!

What do you do when you run out of salt – and the nearest store is more than 2,000 miles away?

When the explorers of the Lewis and Clark expedition arrived at the Pacific coast in 1805, they needed salt to preserve meat, along with adding a little flavor to their meals.  But the supply of salt which they acquired in St. Louis before they began their long and arduous voyage across the vast American West, was exhausted.

So the members of the Corps of North Western Discovery – as Captain Meriwether Lewis called the party in his journal – did the only thing they could: make their own salt.

 

On December 28, 1805, Lewis and Capt. William Clark sent forth a special detachment from their just-completed winter quarters at Fort Clatsop.  Five men traveled overland from the Fort to the coast, searching for the best location for making salt.  On January 1, 1806, the fifth day of their search, these men found the perfect spot: the beach of present-day Seaside, Oregon.  Here is where they set up camp.  Along with several other men who rotated in and out of the salt camp, they proceeded to make salt by boiling sea water for nearly two months, all while enduring the wet winter weather of coastal Oregon, before they returned to Fort Clatsop.

On October 6th and 7th, interpreters from the Pacific Northwest Living Historians (PNLH) will once again bring to life the salt camp which those explorers established 212 years ago, in a program titled “Lewis and Clark Salt Makers.”  The event site will be at the west end of Avenue U in Seaside, near The Tides By The Sea Motel.

After a brief orientation, visitors to the program will enter the camp to “meet” members of the Lewis and Clark expedition, who will be busy making salt by boiling sea water over a fire.

Although this living history program will be part of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation (LCTHF), it is free and open to the public.  It is sponsored by the Oregon Chapter of the LCTHF.  The PNLH will also stage the program in collaboration with the Seaside Museum & Historical Society, Seaside Public Works Department, Clatsop County Work Crew, The Tides By The Sea Motel and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.  Special thanks go to Bev and Mike Carrick of Turner, Oregon; without whose assistance, this program would not be possible.

For more information: contact the PNLH at privatejwhitehouse@gmail.com

…or call the Seaside Museum & Historical Society at (503) 738-7065.

Seaside Museum Hosts 4th of July Old Fashioned Social

Kids’ Games.  Fun.  Food.  Fun.  Bingo.  Fun.  Cakewalk.  Fun.  Music.  Fun.  Silent Auction.  Attending Seaside Museum’s Old-Fashioned Social has been a family tradition for many residents and visitors over its 30 year history. The event is also the Museum’s major annual fundraiser.

social crowd

“Between the parade and the fireworks, there’s the Social,” says  Jay Barber, Seaside’s mayor.  “It’s a not-to-be-missed part of the way to celebrate the 4th of July in Seaside.”

While the band, Smoke and Mirrors provides toe-tapping music from the porch of the Butterfield Cottage, adults and kids can while away the time by playing a variety of games or feasting on picnic fare and chatting with friends and acquaintances.

smoke and mirrors band

The continuous four-hour cakewalk is a favorite game for kids of all ages.  Adults vie, with a passion, to win the pot for each BINGO game.

See what we won!

An additional attraction is a life size replica of the Statue of Liberty for taking selfies.

Festivity participants can place their bids on a variety of silent auction items, which include trips, meals, lodging, art and merchandise.  Outside, raffle tickets and food can be purchased.  Hot dogs, strawberry shortcake, cotton candy and ice cream are just some of the summer food that is available; the Methodist ladies’ pie booth has long been a favorite and sells out quickly.  The raffle winners will take away $50 gift cards to Fred Meyer and an exquisite handcrafted quilt.

quiltfor raffle2018

The Seaside Museum is located at 570 Necanicum Drive in Seaside.  The Social is open from 11am to 3 pm, with the silent auction closing at 2pm.

For more information, contact the Seaside Museum, 738-7065

History & Hops: Terrible Tilly Tales

History & Hops:  Terrible Tilly Tales 

The Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, aka Terrible Tilly, is as iconic an Oregon north coast landmark as Haystack Rock.  Construction of the lighthouse took 500 days and was completed in January 1881.  It was decommissioned in 1957 yet the lighthouse structure remains.  Standing 134 feet tall it has withstood the winds, storms and waves for 137 years, creating a history of its own.

Family history with Terrible Tilly drove Brian Ratty to write his most recently released book “Tillamook Rock Lighthouse: History and Tales of Terrible Tilly”.  In December 2015, Ratty shared some of those stories-in-progress at one of the first History & Hops events presented by the Seaside Museum.  Now Ratty returns to History & Hops, book recently published, to share more of his research, expanding with more tales and historical facts.  He says: “There is something mysterious about the Tillamook Rock Lighthouse, something marvelous and a little macabre. When one sees it, one wants to learn more.”

Ratty said he always felt a special connection to the Tillamook Rock Lighthouse. His grandfather Harry Ratty almost died on the rock in 1934. He became ill due to exposure after a violent storm and was finally evacuated after several attempts at rescue.  Ratty recalls the light’s beacon and horns from the time during WWII when his family lived in Seaside.

This month’s History & Hops will be held at 6pm on Thursday May 31 at the Seaside Brewing Co.

Local historian, photographer and author, Brian Ratty, is a retired media executive and graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography.  He has written numerous magazine articles about the Pacific Northwest and won awards for his historical fiction novels.  For more than thirty years, he has traveled the vast wilderness of the Pacific Coast in search of images and stories that reflect its spirit and splendor.

History & Hops is a series of local history discussions hosted by the Seaside Museum on the last Thursday of each month, September through May, at Seaside Brewing Co., 861 Broadway.

Preserving Seaside’s History since 1974, the Seaside Museum and Historical Society is a non-profit educational institution with the mission to collect, preserve and interpret materials illustrative of the history of Seaside and the surrounding area.  The museum is located at 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside and is open Monday through Saturday from 10A to 3PM.  More information can be found at www.seasideoregonuseum.com

History & Hops:  From Public Baths to Aquarium

 

History & Hops:  From Public Baths to Aquarium

In August 1924 the Seaside Baths Natatorium – a salt water bath house and swimming pool – opened for business.  By 1937 it had morphed into the Seaside Aquarium which is now the oldest privately-owned aquarium on the West Coast.

Keith Chandler, the aquarium’s general manager, will share tales of its 94-year storied past – from construction through conversion and development into a well-regarded marine life showcase.  Those attending Seaside Museum’s History & Hops event on Thursday, April 26th will meet seal Tubby, Jr. and 25-pound lobster, Victor as well as a cast of other marine characters.  The presentation begins at 6PM at the Seaside Brewing Co.

The aquarium has been part of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network since 1990.  As a partner with the Wildlife Center of the North Coast, the aquarium is a drop-off center for injured animals that are then transported by staff to the rehabilitation center in Astoria.

Keith Chandler has worked at the aquarium for almost 40 years.

History & Hops is a series of local history discussions hosted by the Seaside Museum on the last Thursday of each month, September through May, at Seaside Brewing Co., 861 Broadway.

Preserving Seaside’s History since 1974, the Seaside Museum and Historical Society is a non-profit educational institution with the mission to collect, preserve and interpret materials illustrative of the history of Seaside and the surrounding area.  The museum is located at 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside and is open Monday through Saturday from 10A to 3PM.  More information can be found at https://www.seasideoregonmuseum.com 

###

Contact: Tita Montero, Museum Vice President   503-440-4454

History & Hops: The History of Clatsop Plains Geology

History & Hops: The History of Clatsop Plains’ Geology 

What do we see as we travel throughout Seaside and the Clatsop Plains?  We notice that trees have gone; that areas have flooded; that features of the land change over time.  The topography and geology we see have formed over the past 4500 years.  At the next History & Hops, native son Tom Horning, will take us on “A Geologic Tour of Clatsop Plains” sharing how our area formed by slow chronic processes punctuated by infrequent catastrophes.   Great storms and Magnitude 9 subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis caused erosion and changes in vegetation patterns of forests and plains, rearranging landforms, and disrupting Native American communities.

 At 6PM on Thursday, March 28 at Seaside Brewing Co., Horning will cover events from Columbia River sands forming a storm-smashed delta to landslides falling from Tillamook Head with the rocks being transported around the Head to Seaside by storm waves, to regular deposition of silts, gravel, and peat by creeks and rivers flowing off the hills.  He will explain how spectacular tsunami landforms sculpted Seaside and influenced how the town was developed as well as why the Lewis & Clark Salt Works was sited near Avenue N.

Horning proudly shares that he set a record in discus throwing at Seaside High School which stood for 32 years.  He has a master’s degree in geology (with a minor in volcanology) from Oregon State University. After a career as an exploration geologist, he returned to Seaside in 1994 and became a natural hazards and geotechnical consultant doing business as Horning Geosciences.

His volunteer work has included the North Coast Land Conservancy, Seaside Tsunami Advisory Group, Seaside Planning Commission, Seaside Parks Advisory Committee, Seaside Native American Project and he is currently a member of the Seaside City Council.  He also speaks to groups and the media regarding tsunami preparedness.

History & Hops is a series of local history discussions hosted by the Seaside Museum on the last Thursday of each month, September through May, at Seaside Brewing Co., 861 Broadway.

Preserving Seaside’s History since 1974, the Seaside Museum and Historical Society is a non-profit educational institution with the mission to collect, preserve and interpret materials illustrative of the history of Seaside and the surrounding area.  The museum is located at 570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside and is open Monday through Saturday from 10A to 3PM.